Blog, Daily Life, Designing, Knitting, Philosophy

Failure

I think there’s a bit of a misconception about pattern design. Many people seem to believe that designers hit a home run with their designs every time. The math always works, the items always fit, etc.

Now,

Check these bad boys out.

Know what they all have in common?

Some of them are pretty decent sized and complex..

But none of them will ever be published.

That’s because pattern concepts don’t always come out right the first time, or the second, or the twelfth.

Now, it could easily be very upsetting to me that I’ve spent so much time working on concepts that will never see the light of day, but I don’t see it that way.

The purple gloves? They were a concept my husband wanted me to work on. I couldn’t communicate the techniques well enough, so the test failed.

The green sweater? I can’t get the dang sleeves right.

The orange shawl? Well, that motif is clearly not proportional!

But what that does mean is that I’ve now got the opportunity to learn from my mistakes. I no longer design patterns because someone else thinks it would be a good idea, I no longer try to make a crocheted acrylic sweater with a massive stitch gauge for my first garment design, and I don’t try to make people purl twisted stitches on the wrong side of a shawl!

So what does a designer do when pattern writing goes wrong?

I cast on a shawl shape that sounds like fun with a yarn I normally wouldn’t use and start knitting.

When something easy works out, it gives me the courage to try again with other designs. So, for now, I’ll just be hanging out with my Therapy Shawl.

Happy knitting, all!

Current Projects, Daily Life, De-Stashing yarn, Designing, Knitting, Paid Knitting Patterns, Reviews

The Circle of Yarn

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From the day we arrive at the yarn store, and blinking, step in through the wool, there’s more to knit than can ever be knit, more to spin than can ever be spun; It’s the cirrrrrrrcle of yarrrrrn, and it moves us allll…

Speaking of the circle of life, I’ve been trying to film a new episode of my video podcast for the longest time. Apparently, however, having three children makes it difficult to find an hour of quiet in which I also look presentable to be on camera. Who knew?

So, I’ve decided to update my podcast via blog. That’s not to say videos are gone forever, but at least you won’t all think i’ve disappeared into my stash, never to be seen again!

Today will just be a general progress update, but be on the lookout for future posts about fun things like trend alerts, tips & tutorials, and maybe (if I get the courage up!) even some interviews with some of my favorite indie designers!

For now, let’s talk about some designs that have been published since the last podcast, as well as what’s in store for Everyday Yarnworks.

Trust Fall

“Trust Fall” is a new sock pattern that features spiraling dropped stitches over the front of the leg, and comfy ribbing on the back of the leg and sole. It’s a fun design in which I ask you to be a little brave and trust me – let the stitches drop!

 

 

In the projects category, I decided to try my first Stephen West design when I saw the Marled Mania Cardigan .

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The colors are a bit outside of what I would normally use, but I decided on this project because I have quite a few partial or whole skeins of yarn that are either leftovers, or that I purchased from dyers with a design in mind and the design didn’t work out. These are all yarns that have been sitting in my stash for a few years (with the exception of the one all the way to the right in this photo! That was a swap skein), and I want to make sure these pretties actually get used!

My thoughts so far: The pattern lists total estimated yardage, as well as yardage if you use the recommended specialty yarn (Quing Fibres Melted Baby Suri), but because it doesn’t specify the amounts for JUST the yoke, JUST the cuffs etc, I had to re-work the yoke. I wanted it to be the plain royal blue you see below:

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(Yarn is Knit Picks Capretta in the Celestial colorway)

But, obviously I didn’t have enough. So I frogged the entire yoke (let me tell you, frogging a double stranded knit into two single strand balls, which is what’s happening in that photos, was almost enough to make me ditch the project altogether!) and started again with 1 strand of blue and one of a variegated indie dyed skein.

This is definitely going to be a longterm project, but it works well when I need something to knit on in the dark while I watch a movie at night. It’s basically just garter stitch with ribbing under the arms and smidge of basic shaping, so if you can knit by feel and use distinguishing stitch markers it’s a great potato chip knit.

 

More projects will come, but for now I hope you enjoyed catching up a little!

Is there anything from the podcast you miss that you’d like to see here? Drop me a comment and let me know!